Competition

Nov 14, 2017 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: Competition

BoreosIf you are an Android fan boy that's great. Seriously, I have no qualms which camp people wish to reside in. Apple and Google mobile worlds are quiet different, thus it all boils down to this: If you like Borio's instead of Oreo's, Duplo Blocks instead of Legos, preferred Zune instead iPod, leave your car doors unlocked and home front door wide open, then Android phones are for you.

Daniel Bader of Android Central recently reviewed Apple's iPhone X. After reading his review I genuinely felt sorry for him. Bader had to bend, contort, or piecemeal his article in an attempt to come up with an Android outcome that could stand on the same stage as iPhone X. And what of privacy? Bader never much discussed privacy in his review. But it's not like security with iPhone paired with iOS is anything new, and Android paired with off-the-shelf pinball machine parts is something not new.

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Nov 9, 2017 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: Competition

 

Apple_tv_4kApple's 5th generation Apple TV, now known as Apple TV 4K, was recently reviewed by David Pogue of the NY Times, rating it the best streaming box on the market. He's right about that.

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Nov 7, 2017 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: Competition

Iphone_xLet me just start right off with the ugly. There isn't any. Having used the iPhone X all day and night since November 3, hitting it as a power user, there's simply no ugly about iPhone X – it's that good.

As for the bad? If you think I'm going to say "The Notch" think again. As many others have stated, to which I am also a witness, it quickly becomes invisible in the user experience. It matters not, and I simply don't see it. The notch may be marketing fodder for panicking Android hardware makers, but in reality it's an absolute non-issue, and the only thing Samsung can seemingly make fun of. Yet the technology the notch delivers is nothing short of amazing. The only "bad/gripe" I have is with iOS itself and how iPhone X shows the battery life, which displays as a battery icon only. The easiest way to see the battery percentage is to quickly swipe down from the top left corner, or swipe, hold, and push back. It's quick and easy, but it would be trivial for Apple to add a "view percentage" option in Settings. That's it. That's all I've got on anything bad – seriously!

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Oct 20, 2017 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: Competition

Intel_core_i7Intel is a monster, or at least it has been. For nearly three decades Intel has owned the desktop-class and server semiconductor markets. Ever since the DOS PC emerged Intel gained rapid traction into desktop computing. While others, such as AMD, constantly struggled to meet demand, Intel understood capacity and high yields were key to market dominance and never left PC manufacturers wanting. No one had a better silicon fabrication process in the industry. Intel's marketing was equally brilliant. Before the tag line "Intel Inside" no one really knew or cared much about microchips used within a computer. After all, the only interaction a user had was with a keyboard, mouse and display. Suddenly, everyone was asking for a computer with Intel inside.

Intel was so confident of their own ability to shape the future based on their self-serving direction, they no longer needed to own a large portion of ARM, so they sold it off as it was useless for the long term. Intel also decided there was no need to quickly move to 64-bit processors. Intel failed to understand they had built, and were living in, their own arrogant reality distortion field. But AMD knew it, and 2003 stunned the industry by offering their 64-bit backwards compatible 32-bit, Athlon processor. It saved AMD as a company and Intel suffered it's first major stumble. Mobile computing arrived soon after, with Apple commissioning Intel to design a processor for their secret handheld needs. Intel balked, finding it a financially useless pursuit. Thus, Apple launched iPhone with an ARM processor. Due to Intel's blunder, the mobile world runs almost entirely on ARM designs, with Intel nowhere to be found other than under piles of failed ATOM processors. Today Intel finds their bread and butter personal computer market about to be shaken like never before by Microsoft, and quite likely, Apple.

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Sep 27, 2017 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: Competition

Apple_tv_4kReviews are now out for the Apple TV 4K, yet most tech journalists are providing a moderate to slanted review against the new device. What really stands out is how journalists are hypocritically treating the new Apple TV 4K.

Since Roku and others have provided 4K capabilities as early as 2015, Apple has been bashed, lashed and flogged for not providing 4K capabilities in the 4th generation Apple TV. Never mind that there was virtually no 4K content available in 2015. Never mind that 4K TV sales only comprised 10.1% of then entire TV sales mix in 2014. Never mind that the total combination of those that had:

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Sep 21, 2017 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: Competition

Iphone_xThere's no question, I'm waiting for the arrival of iPhone X, and apparently tens of millions of people across the globe are as well. iPhone 8 pre-sales are brisk but not earth shattering, and that is likely to mean only one thing: iPhone X is going to be a big, big, deal. 

I've upgraded every two years since my first-ever iPhone, the iPhone 3G. I'm currently sporting an iPhone 7, which means I should be another year away for my next upgrade. However, iPhone X may have changed my two-year cycle, along with millions of others. I have never considered the larger iPhone Plus models until this past year. With ever-expanding unlimited data plans and my increased use of streaming video, I've found myself wanting a slightly larger display to watch tennis, football or basketball while working out on the gym bike or waiting for my next flight. So why not the iPhone 8 Plus?

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Sep 19, 2017 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: Competition

Iphone_vs_androidIf you are on the fence as to whether you should consider moving from an Android smartphone to a new iPhone, but still feel comfortable in giving away virtually every ounce of your 4th amendment right to privacy, prefer a slow and out-of-date processor (coupled with inferior camera technology), are comfy cozy wth an ecosystem that has you searching for fragmented cloud solutions between computer, phone, tablet and watch, and love selling your phone for virtually nothing every 2 or 3 years, then another Android phone may be the right fit for your future.

But before you tell me that the latest iPhones really look appealing, please keep in mind that an Android smartphone provides just about everything you shouldn't be looking for in a smartphone, and you may even get an unexpected bonus or two, such as a phone that explodes in your four-year-old's hands or a nice bit of malware that steals your banking information. These are all clever and surprising things an Android phone can deliver – at any time. Thus, if this is what you have come to expect and live with, then an iPhone may be a complete shock to your digital way of life. 

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Jun 27, 2017 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: Competition

ArkitApple's newly unveiled Augmented Reality Kit (ARKit) has developers diving in and thinking about the possibilities. Apple provided a presentation of the technology at their World Wide Developers Conference earlier this month and it did not disappoint. Virtual objects were shown on a table, taking into account the surface size, camera movement and lighting solutions, all in real-time. Needless to say it was an impressive demonstration.

During the unveiling of ARKit, Apple had John Knoll of Industrial Light and Magic (ILM) provide a Star Wars VR presentation. John introduced Lauren Ridge of EPIC Games, who was backstage, complete with green screen and her VR goggles ready to go. John and Lauren showed off a Star Wars experience and some quick programming, adding in tie-fighters and Darth Vader for what played out as a pretty close call with the Dark Lord. It was cool stuff, but I started revisiting the presentation again. As Darth Vader came towards Lauren, what if she had a physical lightsaber that integrated into the game? ILM and EPIC Games could deliver the holy grail where VR and reality completely blur. But it could go much further.

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Jun 22, 2017 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: Competition

Leo_satallitesLately, Apple has been adding to their space exploration team. Not only does Apple have their sights set on your mobile life, but evidently they look up at night and think about how to reach for the stars. Apple recently added two of Google's satellite executives to some vaguely understood hardware team. In April an inside-the-satellite-beltway blog site talked of Apple working with Boeing regarding Low Earth Orbit (LEO) multi-thousand satellite deployment. Sounds cool, but when it comes to Apple, the age old question remains; What's in it for me?

Have you ever been on a cruise or taken a flight? How about visiting another country far away or hiking to parts unknown? In each scenario internet access often costs far too much to justify, or simply isn't available. If you've ever attended a college football game good luck getting anything in or out of your iPhone, as the towers are typically jammed solid with traffic. Now envision all these places, or virtually everywhere, providing strong signal with amazing speeds for any task, anywhere, any time. That's what's in it for you.

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Jun 14, 2017 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: Competition

Apple_car3Project Titan, Apple's not-so-secret car program, has apparently been all over the map. But just when the Titan finally appeared to have legs, former Ford executive, Steve Zadesky, who was heading up Apple's automotive project, left the company in September, 2016. Filling Zadesky's vacuum, veteran Apple executive Bob Mansfield promptly took over the reigns. According to the New York Times, Mansfield immediately slashed the Titan workforce, whittling the program down to autonomous-only driving solutions. Earlier this week Apple CEO, Tim Cook, just revealed publicly that autonomous driving is indeed Apple's direction. But I've never bought into any Apple CEO's public comments (only delivering part of a picture they want us to see), nor do I buy into the "paper of record" rumors, nor should you.

Mansfield has saved many fledging programs at Apple, working with shoestring teams while delivering remarkable results. Project Titan had become a program losing it's Apple culture, while gaining a bloated staff with far too many Detroit executives running the show. Mansfield was tasked to bring the program back to Apple's roots with a lean and focused team. Evidence continues to mount an Apple car has always been – and still is – on it's way.

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