WWDC

May 14, 2015 — by: E. Werner Reschke
Categories: WWDC

Apple-mac-os-x-10

We have become spoiled — every year a new version of OS X. For the most part the updates to OS X have been good, but sometimes we lament that a particular feature was removed or that Apple has a new implementation of a feature we liked the way it was. But the most glaring criticism over the past couple years has been the move away from a rich and deep look to a more flat and, what critics call, “cartoony” look.

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May 6, 2015 — by: Mark & Werner Reschke
Categories: WWDC

Spring is upon us, and that means one thing — WWDC 2015 is just around the corner. Kicking off the conference will be Tim Cook’s keynote event, which is one of the most highly anticipated in many years. Many rumors and speculators have been clogging the internet as to what the keynote will reveal.

We have complied a list of such possibilities with percentages of each item coming true or not:

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Dec 30, 2014 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: WWDC

Apple_and_intel

It was a strange scene during Apple’s WWDC (World Wide Developers Conference) keynote in 2005. Steve Jobs stunned the audience by announcing the end of the PPC processor and ushering in a new era with Intel. Intel’s then CEO, Paul Otellini, strolled onto the stage in a clean room suit, looking absolutely ridiculous, but it was a crowning achievement for Intel. Apple, the lone holdout, was now an Intel Inside brand, and would bring additional margin to the diminutive chip maker. Apple transitioned its entire lineup of Macs to Intel within 12 months — a year ahead of schedule. But for all the success Apple has had in switching to Intel as a processor supplier, the Intel era appears to be coming to an end.

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Jun 10, 2014 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: WWDC

Ios8-extensibility

This year’s WWDC 14 keynote was a treasure trove for developers. From an all new coding environment to a bounty of new API’s, and even an improved iCloud architecture to leverage — the show was pure developer candy. Apple also gave consumers something to look forward to coming this Fall. Apple’s Sr. VP of Software Engineering, Craig Federighi, delivered iOS 8 Extensibility. For users of Apple’s mobile devices iOS 8 Extensibility is going to be a very big deal.

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Jun 9, 2014 — by: Karl Johnson
Categories: WWDC

Icloud-icon-by-gabrydesign-d4h798cAt WWDC, Apple unveiled many new iCloud features. One of those features is iCloud drive. Users will be able to store files on iCloud directly from the Finder with multiple layers of folders. They will also be able to store photos on iCloud. Hopefully, iPhoto and Aperture will integrate iCloud in their next updates.

When users start to store more files in iCloud, the demand for better storage payment options will rise. Apple already addressed these demands at WWDC as well with a new pricing model. The following chart compares the new iCloud pricing against the old iCloud, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Dropbox, and Box. Also noted is how much one gets for free and the price per year for 20GB, 50GB, 100GB, 200GB, and 1TB.

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Jun 6, 2014 — by: E. Werner Reschke
Categories: WWDC

Osx_yosemite-finder

Not much has been said about the Dock in OS X Yosemite. Tim and Craig briefly touched on the flatter interface and how the windows are more translucent — adapting to the “temperature” of the surrounding environment (via the desktop background picture). But there are other refinements within the Dock that didn’t make it in OS X Mavericks that will be part of OS X Yosemite:

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Jun 5, 2014 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: WWDC

Metal_crisis_and_riseApple’s developer conference keynote held at San Francisco’s Moscone West convention center left developers’ heads spinning. The flood of new technologies Cook and his VP’s delivered was simply staggering. Among the slew of announcements was Apple’s impressive new technology called Metal. 

Metal is a graphics API for iOS, squarely targeted at game developers. Metal’s objective is to eliminate OpenGL by giving developers more power with direct access to the graphics processor. This will allow high-end gaming developers to push the limits of Apple’s A7 (and likely forthcoming A8) processor found within the latest iOS devices. The result is Apple’s CPU and GPU will work together in “seamless harmony” as Apple says, allowing games like Ryse: Son of Rome, to look and feel like its high-end console counterpart on xBOX ONE.

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Jun 4, 2014 — by: E. Werner Reschke
Categories: WWDC

WWDC 14

A two hour Keynote by Apple at WWDC 14,... and no new hardware. To some this was a big disappointment. Wall Street reacted (as they always do) by sending AAPL stock down on Monday, but on Tuesday they had reconsidered and sent Apple’s stock to another 52-week high. Along with Wall Street others had eagerly anticipated at least a new iPhone or were hoping for something else, something big — like a new category product (iWatch or a new form-factor Apple TV). But a new hardware announcement did not happen, and there are some good reasons why.

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Jun 3, 2014 — by: E. Werner Reschke
Categories: WWDC

OS X Yosemite Spotlight

In yesterday’s Keynote Craig Federighi, aka Hair Force One, gave us a preview of OS X Yosemite. One feature he spent a few moments on was Spotlight. Spotlight is Apple’s internal search engine to help you find apps, files, contacts, etc. on your Mac. However, that will change in a significant way with OS X Yosemite.

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Jun 2, 2014 — by: E. Werner Reschke
Categories: WWDC

OS X Yosemite Mail EnhancementsOS X Mail is as old as is OS X — as Mail was one of the core apps with the original OS X 10.0 release. Since then Mail has gone through many updates as has OS X. While the Keynote at WWDC 14 introduced the predictable bug fixes and enhancements to Mail syncing and application speed, there were three absolutely huge new productivity tools added to Mail in OS X Yosemite.

Mail Drop

Mail Drop is an incredible idea, and once you use it you’ll wonder why someone didn’t think of this before. Mail Drop solves the problem of sending large attachments through email. As we all know, the experience is iffy at best when emailing someone a large attachment. Sometimes the email goes through, sometimes it doesn’t — for a myriad of reasons.

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