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iOS 8: Extensibility is a Big Deal

by: Mark Reschke | Jun 10, 2014

Ios8-extensibility

This year’s WWDC 14 keynote was a treasure trove for developers. From an all new coding environment to a bounty of new API’s, and even an improved iCloud architecture to leverage — the show was pure developer candy. Apple also gave consumers something to look forward to coming this Fall. Apple’s Sr. VP of Software Engineering, Craig Federighi, delivered iOS 8 Extensibility. For users of Apple’s mobile devices iOS 8 Extensibility is going to be a very big deal.

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Icloud-icon-by-gabrydesign-d4h798cAt WWDC, Apple unveiled many new iCloud features. One of those features is iCloud drive. Users will be able to store files on iCloud directly from the Finder with multiple layers of folders. They will also be able to store photos on iCloud. Hopefully, iPhoto and Aperture will integrate iCloud in their next updates.

When users start to store more files in iCloud, the demand for better storage payment options will rise. Apple already addressed these demands at WWDC as well with a new pricing model. The following chart compares the new iCloud pricing against the old iCloud, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Dropbox, and Box. Also noted is how much one gets for free and the price per year for 20GB, 50GB, 100GB, 200GB, and 1TB.

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OS X Yosemite: Did Apple's Dock Get Better?

by: E. Werner Reschke | Jun 06, 2014

Osx_yosemite-finder

Not much has been said about the Dock in OS X Yosemite. Tim and Craig briefly touched on the flatter interface and how the windows are more translucent — adapting to the “temperature” of the surrounding environment (via the desktop background picture). But there are other refinements within the Dock that didn’t make it in OS X Mavericks that will be part of OS X Yosemite:

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Metal_crisis_and_riseApple’s developer conference keynote held at San Francisco’s Moscone West convention center left developers’ heads spinning. The flood of new technologies Cook and his VP’s delivered was simply staggering. Among the slew of announcements was Apple’s impressive new technology called Metal. 

Metal is a graphics API for iOS, squarely targeted at game developers. Metal’s objective is to eliminate OpenGL by giving developers more power with direct access to the graphics processor. This will allow high-end gaming developers to push the limits of Apple’s A7 (and likely forthcoming A8) processor found within the latest iOS devices. The result is Apple’s CPU and GPU will work together in “seamless harmony” as Apple says, allowing games like Ryse: Son of Rome, to look and feel like its high-end console counterpart on xBOX ONE.

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WWDC 14

A two hour Keynote by Apple at WWDC 14,... and no new hardware. To some this was a big disappointment. Wall Street reacted (as they always do) by sending AAPL stock down on Monday, but on Tuesday they had reconsidered and sent Apple’s stock to another 52-week high. Along with Wall Street others had eagerly anticipated at least a new iPhone or were hoping for something else, something big — like a new category product (iWatch or a new form-factor Apple TV). But a new hardware announcement did not happen, and there are some good reasons why.

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Apple_beatsWith Apple's acquisition of Beats Electronics, you would think Apple had purchased Comcast or Exxon Mobile. "Beats is Apple's biggest acquisition ever", rave the media. Apple's $3 billion purchase was good for Apple's brand and future opportunity, but sorry hype machine, it is a nearly irrelevant financial acquisition for Apple.

$3 billion is evidently the final price tag Apple and Beats settled upon. The multi-billion mark is certainly a nice payday for Jimmy Lovine and Dr. Dre, but the dollar figure is relative, and should only be viewed as a big or small figure based on the company it's coming from.

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WWDC 14 Recap: OS X Yosemite Spotlight on Steroids

by: E. Werner Reschke | Jun 03, 2014

OS X Yosemite Spotlight

In yesterday’s Keynote Craig Federighi, aka Hair Force One, gave us a preview of OS X Yosemite. One feature he spent a few moments on was Spotlight. Spotlight is Apple’s internal search engine to help you find apps, files, contacts, etc. on your Mac. However, that will change in a significant way with OS X Yosemite.

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WWDC 14 Recap: OS X Yosemite Mail Enhancements

by: E. Werner Reschke | Jun 02, 2014

OS X Yosemite Mail EnhancementsOS X Mail is as old as is OS X — as Mail was one of the core apps with the original OS X 10.0 release. Since then Mail has gone through many updates as has OS X. While the Keynote at WWDC 14 introduced the predictable bug fixes and enhancements to Mail syncing and application speed, there were three absolutely huge new productivity tools added to Mail in OS X Yosemite.

Mail Drop

Mail Drop is an incredible idea, and once you use it you’ll wonder why someone didn’t think of this before. Mail Drop solves the problem of sending large attachments through email. As we all know, the experience is iffy at best when emailing someone a large attachment. Sometimes the email goes through, sometimes it doesn’t — for a myriad of reasons.

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IphotoMany people rely iPhoto as their sole photo management tool on the Mac. That is because iPhoto is well designed with all the basic features one needs. However iPhoto does have some room for improvement. Problems can occur when users want to switch to a different application for either editing or managing those files.

To edit photos in a different application, users can either export the modified file, the original file, or go digging into the library to find the original files. The original file is the best to use with other applications. The problem occurs when users add meta-data to pictures in iPhoto. Meta-data includes geolocation information, captions, keywords, etc. This information is not stored in the original file, but in the iPhoto library. The only way to transfer this information, is to export a copy from iPhoto. However, if the iPhoto library gets corrupted or iPhoto stops working, that data could be lost. All the time adding meta-data to photos would not be lost if that meta-data could be saved to a file instead of just within iPhoto library. Those original files can then be transferred to other applications.

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WWDC 14: Pre-Conference Photos

by: E. Werner Reschke | May 31, 2014

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