from January 2011, News

Jan 28, 2011 — by: Karl Johnson
Categories: News

The Mac App Store is leveling the playing field for developers. It does not matter if you are big or small, anyone can get on the front page of the Mac Store. No longer do developers need to pay big money for distribution partners and sales agents. While the Mac App Store continues to grow, so will those who have their applications in its store.

Applications now will compete on price, quality and feature set instead of back room deals and marketing agreements. Developers will still need to get the word out about their applications, but this will vary depending on how big the developer is.

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Jan 26, 2011 — by: Karl Johnson
Categories: News

According to Apple's track record, the iMac lineup is due for a refresh this spring.  This update will focus on bringing the iMac up-to-date with the latest technology and prepare it for Lion 10.7.  This will be a minor update, with a major one expected sometime around January 2012.

Apple has been updating their iMac line around every 8 months with major updates coming out every 27 months. The next iMac update is due out this March. The last major update was the 27" iMac which came out in October 2009.  As Apple usually has one or two minor updates between their major releases. The last minor update was in July 2010. Although Apple has been known to update the iMacs more frequently, Apple is focused on a major update to the MacBook Pro line instead. This update will focus in on three areas: Sandy Bridge, SSD, and a high resolution display.

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Jan 21, 2011 — by: Karl Johnson
Categories: News

AT&T is adjusting it's messaging pricing plans to be more competitive with Verizon this week. They are changing their $5/200 and $15/1500 messaging plans to one $10/1000 plan for the iPhone. Verizon has not given us any details on its messaging plans for the iPhone, but current subscribers pay $5/250 with $10/500 add-on package.

These new adjustments don't seem to make AT&T that much more competitive If you send a lot of text messages, AT&T always had a better plan. For those who don't send very many messages, AT&T is becoming even less competitive by upping the entry fee from $5 to $10 for the base package. AT&T's new plan would cost 1 penny per message. That may seem cheap until you look at the cost per bandwidth. Text messages are really just bits of data and should be charged by the byte instead of by the message.

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Jan 20, 2011 — by: Karl Johnson
Categories: News

 According to Financial Times, Chinese environmental groups want Apple to improve pollution and health issues at factories building their products. They ranked Apple last in a list of 29 multinational companies in regards to how Apple responds to their inquires.

These Chinese environmental groups should be going after the factory owners instead of the multinational companies that buy the products. Apple does have a lot of leverage when working with its suppliers to improve workers conditions, but it should not be their job. If it is such a major concern, these groups should also be working with the government to help improve (government mandated) workers conditions. Without help from the government via laws, will these conditions really ever improve?

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Jan 19, 2011 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: News

John Gruber of Daring Fireball came out with a big piece of news, claiming iPad 2 isn't likely to receive a retina display similar to that of the iPhone - don't place your bets quite yet.

Siting sources, Gruber believes the current iPad display (1024 x 768 resolution) is what will also be found on the iPad 2. Countering Gruber’s claims, Engadget maintains a retina display is coming to the iPad 2. So who should we believe? First, let’s start with a few facts, followed by some reasonably sourced information that delivers a different side of the story.

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Jan 17, 2011 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: News

Apple may be preparing a massive move that will propel Safari from niche browser to market leader. The move to merge Safari and iTunes into one software solution appears long in the works, which may arrive this fall at Apple's usual iPod special event.

Apple acquired the streaming music services company, lala, for $80 million in December 2009. The purported purposes for such an acquisition was for Apple to spearhead the way towards taking iTunes towards an online service, accessible via any browser, and away from a desktop software solution. That may no longer be the case.

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Jan 13, 2011 — by: Karl Johnson
Categories: News

Apple's app store is pulling away from the rest of the app stores as the place to introduce new applications to the world. Only if the application is successful, will it be ported to another platforms. The App Store not only makes it easy for users to find the best apps, it also gives developers a unified platform to build and sell their apps.

While Android begins to dominate the smart-phone market-share, it has no clear app store. Google Android Market is the official app store for Android, but there are as many app stores for Android as there are phones running it. Most device manufacturers have opened up stores for their own devices to increase their revenue. Amazon has created their own App Store for Android to compete with Google. With all these app stores, which one do you choose?

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Jan 12, 2011 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: News

175The talk of the town is Apple's big iPhone 4 deal with Verizon, but Google also came to the table yesterday with a little announcement of their own. Google delivered an under-the-radar announcement, stating they will be dropping support for the h.264 codec in favor of their open source WebM codec.

Google claims their Chrome browser dropping h.264 is about supporting open standards. If Google were truly concerned with supporting open standards, why does the proprietary Flash still ship with Chrome as a preinstalled plug-in? As John Gruber of Daring Fireball points out, the hypocrisy is thick.

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Jan 7, 2011 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: News

Apple's launch of the Mac OS X App Store appears to be an instant success. Apple was on center stage Thursday with their iWork apps ready for download, but one application made available today from Apple caught everyone off guard —Aperture.

The arrival of Aperture on the App Store isn't a just a shot across Adobe's bow, that doesn't do Apple's move justice. What Apple did to Adobe's Photoshop Lightroom software is equivalent to hundreds of cannon rounds being fired upon a ship at point blank range. T-GAAP asked Adobe PR if any Adobe apps were heading to Apple's App Store, but we did not receive a response. But it gets worse for Adobe.

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Jan 4, 2011 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: News

According to Fortune, this past Thursday Gene Munster of Piper Jaffray released a research note on Apple, Inc.

In the release, Munster delivers a 2011 Apple roadmap that made us sit up and take notice. It wasn't just one or two ideas that were mentioned — but virtually all of them. Some of these predictions just seemed a bit too close to home for us to ignore. It brings to mind how, and where, Piper Jaffray (and perhaps other analysts) acquire their information? Let's take a closer look at Piper's predictions:

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