OS X

Apr 23, 2014 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: OS X

Wwdc_feverWWDC fever is at an all time high, and there is no wondering why. By the time WWDC arrives it will have been nine months since Apple’s top brass has taken to the stage and introduced something new, or even a scant product update. That’s a long time in technology time. Fans, developers and even Apple’s competition are all waiting to see what surprises Apple has in store.

Newer versions of iOS and OS X will be the foundation to the conference. What is yet unknown will most likely revolve around hardware. What Apple will do to   surprise and delight developers and conference attendees is always what drives the show.

 Read More

Apr 9, 2014 — by: E. Werner Reschke
Categories: OS X

Napa Valley, California - OS X 10.10As we are all getting settled into the latest release of OS X Mavericks 10.9.2, the Cupertino tribe is busy working away on the next major release of OS X. Our Bay Area source has just informed Three Guys and a Podcast that the official name will be derived from the internal code name which is “Syrah” — a type of red wine. Therefore, the official OS X name for the next major release is to be “Napa Valley”, or “Napa” for short.

Our source also noted that there have been internal discussions at Apple concerning whether to use future OS X names to promote all of California or just locations surrounding the Bay Area. If you’ve ever been to California there is a big riff between No-Cal and So-Cal. Most of Apple’s talent lives or is from the Bay Area, and while the new OS X naming convention is supposed to reflect “Made in California”, there is no love loss for only picking Northern California destinations for the next several OS X releases.

 Read More

Apr 7, 2014 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: OS X

Pirates_searchGoogle, Bing, Yahoo!, Ask Network, AOL, DuckDuckGo, and even Dogpile. Do we really need another search engine, especially since no one has proven they can touch Google's dominance?

According to comScore Google’s February 2014 share of search was a very steady 67.5%, with Microsoft’s Bing search engine light years behind, holding onto 18.4%. Yahoo! was the only other search provider to reach over 10%. Why would Apple ever choose to enter such a mature market? The only way to obtain market share is to steal from a competitor — a space Google is laser focused on never relinquishing.

 Read More

Apr 2, 2014 — by: E. Werner Reschke
Categories: OS X

SoundOS X Mavericks is a great OS upgrade. From better handling of multiple displays with improved Spaces/Mission Control to the more advanced technologies of better power utilization, OS X Mavericks has been a delight to use — most of the time.

One annoying bug that is echoed on Apple’s Community Support pages is the loss of sound after a few days of running OS X Mavericks. Some people explaining loosing all sound prompts while others describe only Mail.app and a couple of other specific apps loose their sound. However sound is lost, people don’t seem to like the net result.

 Read More

Mar 19, 2014 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: OS X

Airdrop_almostYesterday, Apple released the latest beta version of OS X, 10.9.3 to developers. The newly minted code focuses on graphics and audio driver enhancements, finalizing bug-free support for 4k (UHD) displays.

Really? That's the focus?

 Read More

Feb 19, 2014 — by: Mark Reschke
Categories: OS X
Apple_macbook_air

Apple's A7 Processor found in the iPad Air and iPhone 5S is a stunning achievement amongst mobile processors. There is no chipset in its class and the industry knows it. Samsung, Intel, Qualcomm and nVIDIA all scrambling to play catchup. But for all its current achievements, the future glory of Apple's A-series processors is likely to be found in what Steve Jobs described as “trucks” — that is — desktops and laptops running OS X.

During Apple's iPad Air reveal, Apple's top brass were keen on calling the A7 “64-bit desktop-class architecture” showcasing technical details not typically shared by Apple executives. The A7 has over 1 billion transistors, rapidly catching up with Intel's latest Ivy Bridge architecture (found in Intel's Core i-series of processors), all in a package only slightly larger than the previous generation A6.

 Read More

Dec 17, 2013 — by: Karl Johnson
Categories: OS X

Icloud-logoApple cleaned up iCloud’s many syncing bugs with iOS 7 and OS X version 10.9. Not all of them are gone, but enough to make it reliable. Now that iCloud is a stable solution, developers have been adding iCloud features to their software. As iCloud continues to grow in popularity, users will be asking for more features.

There are lot of features that Apple could add to iCloud. What are the most important ones? Which features will have the most impact on the users? Here are three features that would have the most impact.

 Read More

Nov 7, 2013 — by: E. Werner Reschke
Categories: OS X

Dallas-cowboysMac OS X has come a long, long way. When it was first released in 2001, Apple was struggling to make a comeback. The multi-colored iMac platform had been launched, but it was running OS 9 dot something. There were not any iPods, iPads, or iPhones to help Apple’s cause.

Now it seems you can’t walk into a coffee shop, hotel lobby or airport without seeing someone using a product from Apple. However, more telling of Apple’s success is the comeback of the Mac. It has only been since the launch of the iPhone and iPad that Macs are now appearing everywhere — including being used by the Dallas Cowboys.

 Read More

Nov 4, 2013 — by: E. Werner Reschke
Categories: OS X
Os-x-mavericks-free-upgrade

When Apple announced that their new Mac desktop operating system, OS X Mavericks, was going to be free, the audience roared with approval. Just like with iOS, now OS X was a free upgrade.

This news must have driven Microsoft completely nuts. Microsoft’s entire business model consists of writing software and then charging a license fee to each user. For Windows and Office it can cost anywhere from $99-499 per license. The notion that software should be, or can be, free is actually a monster Microsoft created the mid-90's In 1996 a company called Netscape was charging $30 for their Navigator browser. At the time Navigator was the most popular browser on the market. Microsoft was late to the browser game. Therefore in order to make a quick dent in market share Microsoft decided to give Internet Explorer away for free. Explorer became “part” of the operating system. The era of paying for software began to decline.

 Read More

Nov 1, 2013 — by: E. Werner Reschke
Categories: OS X

MavericksWith OS X Mavericks, Apple ended the era of naming their desktop operating system after big cats (Puma, Lion, Leopard,...). OS X Mavericks is the first in a series of naming conventions focused on areas around California. Mavericks is a surfing town on the coast of California, near Apple head quarters. This new naming goes nicely with the new signature Apple recently launched: “Designed by Apple in California”.

So what is next? Isn't that always the question after the launch of a new product passes? What will the name of the next OS X release be? Here's a few we thought of and a few we thought Apple should stay away from...

 Read More